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An 18-year-old says she was robbed while giving someone a ride Sunday, according to a report from Little Rock police.

The Van Buren teen told officers she was taking “some guy,” whom she described as a 5-foot-tall male weighing about 150 pounds with a dark complexion and long, braided black hair, to an address near the intersection of Fair Park Boulevard and West 12th Street around 5:30 a.m.

According to the report, she reached into her wallet to give him $10 and began counting her money, at which point he snatched $300 and ran to a nearby 1999 Dodge.

The teen told officers the Dodge then backed into her 2008 Nissan Altima “on purpose to get away.” Police said neither she nor a man who was a passenger in the car were injured.

A witness told officers that the 18-year-old was trying to buy marijuana when she was robbed.

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Hear the report by KUAR’s Daniel Breen.

Potential operators of medical marijuana cultivation facilities and dispensaries came together at a half-day symposium in Little Rock Wednesday to discuss their expectations of what the new industry will be like.

Among the attendees was TV host Montel Williams, who gave the keynote address at the event organized by the Arkansas Medical Marijuana Association. Williams has multiple sclerosis, and has long advocated for medicinal cannabis use. His visit had added significance, since he recently accepted a position on the association’s board.

One hopeful distributor, who didn’t want to be named pending the approval of his license, said applications averaged about 1,000 pages long. 

“The application process was rather intense. We had over a three-and-a-half week process of 18 hours a day, just really in-depth, very in-depth process,” he said. 

The symposium, which was held at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock William H. Bowen School of Law, came two days after the deadline for would-be marijuana cultivators and dispensary operators to file applications with the state. According to Arkansas Medical Marijuana Association Board member Dan Roda, the number of applications received by the Department of Finance and Administration were around 300. 

Though legal medical pot represents a promising untapped market for some, Williams stressed most revenue from the cannabis industry should benefit patients. Mollie Balfe echoed this sentiment, saying her community of El Dorado seeks to benefit from a marijuana dispensary. 

“I think that it is the individual company’s responsibility to stimulate their own community with the money that they may make. As far as what the state does with their money, I feel that’s something out of our control,” Balfe said.

Balfe manages communications for South Arkansas Cannabis Solutions, a group that applied for both cultivation and

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The President has now called the opiod addiction a national crisis.  There is a new radical approach to fix this problem in America.  Medicinal marijuana is not street smoking marijuana–it is created in a lab in other forms.  Dr. Oz is the biggest advocate of using this natural herb to prevent addictions to opioids. When a doctor prescribes medical marijuana the signals to the brain to need drugs for pain are cut-off.

Opioids, like heroin, kill 91 people every single day. Now, there’s a bold and controversial solution that many believe is a promising way to help fix the crisis. Could medical marijuana be the secret weapon to fighting opioid addiction? People with heroin or opioid addiction find it almost impossible to go cold turkey.

Dr. Oz and Montel Williams (a spokesperson for the Partnership for Prescription. Williams is also active with the nonprofit MS Foundation, which he founded after being diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in 1999) went behind the scenes to a marijuana plant to see how it is grown. Dr. Yasmin Hurd, neuroscientist, spoke about how studies are not being opened up for chronic pain.  Oz believes that patients are being over treated with chemicals causing opioid addictions to prevent pain.

Williams spoke recently at a recent Arkansas Medical Marijuana Association symposium. “Marijuana isn’t a gateway drug, it is probably going to be the first line of defense exit drug for opioid addiction,” said Williams.  “What makes people think they have the right to step in when the doctor says marijuana or cannabinoids? It’s ridiculous and its done not because of any medical reason whatsoever. It’s done because of lies and false information that people have had and they continue to perpetrate and has caused this stigma that needs to be removed,” said Williams. “I have leg tremors, pain, I have things most people won’t

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By JACK WEATHERLY

It’s got to be one of the most unusual rescue teams helping out the flood victims in the Houston area.

One produces relaxation drink Lean Slow Motion Potion and “hemp-infused brownies,” Kush Cakes, and markets them with a decided hip hop slant.

The other manufactures duck calls, and promotes duck hunting and duck culture featuring the Robertson clan with long ZZ Top-style beards.

Together they have helped flood victims.

Demar International Inc., which was founded by pharmacist Marco Moran and is headquartered in Clinton, responded to health needs.

“I immediately contacted members of our staff at our subsidiary pharmacies and clinics to ask them to gather as much diabetic supplies, general medical supplies [as] we could spare,” Moran said in a release issued Sept. 15.

Willie Robertson, chief executive of Duck Commander and star of Arts and Entertainment show “Duck Dynasty,” saw to it that victims got clothing and outdoor wear.

Of Demar, Robertson said in the release, “They share the same passion as we do at Duck Commander to help those in need.”

It also shares business interests with Demar, which now markets Willie’s Duck Diner, which reopened Sept. 7 in West Monroe, La.

(Duck Commander The Experience is also nearby, offering 15 galleries of family artifacts and pictures, set recreations and clothing from the television show Duck Dynasty, and offers the “sensorial” experience of a duck hunt with the Robertson Family.)

Efforts to reach Moran and Robertson by phone for this article were unsuccessful, but there is no shortage of Internet postings and releases, as well as filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

Moran is former chairman of the Mississippi District Export Council.

Dewmar is traded Over the Counter as a “penny stock,” which is about what its common shares closed at on Tuesday.

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Hear the report by KUAR’s Daniel Breen.

Potential operators of medical marijuana cultivation facilities and dispensaries came together at a half-day symposium in Little Rock Wednesday to discuss their expectations of what the new industry will be like.

Among the attendees was TV host Montel Williams, who gave the keynote address at the event organized by the Arkansas Medical Marijuana Association. Williams has multiple sclerosis, and has long advocated for medicinal cannabis use. His visit had added significance, since he recently accepted a position on the association’s board.

One hopeful distributor, who didn’t want to be named pending the approval of his license, said applications averaged about 1,000 pages long. 

“The application process was rather intense. We had over a three-and-a-half week process of 18 hours a day, just really in-depth, very in-depth process,” he said. 

The symposium, which was held at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock William H. Bowen School of Law, came two days after the deadline for would-be marijuana cultivators and dispensary operators to file applications with the state. According to Arkansas Medical Marijuana Association Board member Dan Roda, the number of applications received by the Department of Finance and Administration were around 300. 

Though legal medical pot represents a promising untapped market for some, Williams stressed most revenue from the cannabis industry should benefit patients. Mollie Balfe echoed this sentiment, saying her community of El Dorado seeks to benefit from a marijuana dispensary. 

“I think that it is the individual company’s responsibility to stimulate their own community with the money that they may make. As far as what the state does with their money, I feel that’s something out of our control,” Balfe said.

Balfe manages communications for South Arkansas Cannabis Solutions, a group that applied for both cultivation and

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At last cumulative count, Arkansas had 322 applicants for 37 licenses to grow and/or sell what’s been dubbed “medical” marijuana in what used to be called the Natural State, only the rush to become legalized dope dealers is proving decidedly unnatural. Folks at the state’s Finance and Administration Department now report that enterprises whose names allude to pot can be found all over Arkansas’ map. Names such as Down South Dispensary, Arkansas Green Cross, Delta Cannabis Co. and Emerald’s Medical Marijuana Dispensary. A fellow could get high and hazy just by reading the extensive list.

So come one, come all, because seating is limited at this show that might be the most popular number in this theater of the absurd. Just where are these budding entrepreneurs eager to do well by selling this now-semi-legal weed? The haze is growing so thick it’s not easy to spot them all. To quote David Couch, a big supporter of Amendment 98, the Medical Marijuana Amendment, the rush for licenses to dispense locoweed can be found “all over the state. There’s no area of the state that doesn’t have interest.”

Yes, Little Rock may now have the most businesses whose names are connected to the growing and selling of weed, but the competition for that dubious honor is fierce across the state. Such enterprises can be found in hamlets like Glenwood and Hardy as well as college towns like Fayetteville, Jonesboro and Arkadelphia. So don’t let the smoke get in your eyes, and you can spot the folks out to make a buck just about anywhere.

The plot thickens as it always does wherever federal law and federal agents become involved. For a sure sign of confusing things to come, note that Cannaco Dispensary Inc. has been registered in Hot Springs National Park,

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A local group could soon move forward with plans to launch the first legalized medical marijuana cultivation and dispensary facility in El Dorado, per approvals from federal and state entities.

South Arkansas Cannabis Solutions, LLC, is looking to enter into a lease-purchase agreement with an investor, a limited liability corporation, who submitted the only bid on Sept. 15 in a court-ordered real estate auction for the former Therma-Flite manufacturing facility on Champagnolle Road.

Local attorney Mattison Thomas, who is representing Cannibis Solutions, said the group submitted the only bid during the real estate auction.

Another group of local investors who had been interested in purchasing the building did not submit a bid on Sept. 15.

The $1.5 million bid is now being considered by U.S. District and Bankruptcy Courts of the Southern District of Texas.

Thomas said his client is confident the court will approve the bid, noting that it is the second auction for the Champagnolle Road facility as part of the court mandate.

The first auction was held in July and did not produce any successful bids.

Thomas said he expects to hear back from the court by November.

Thomas said auction proceedings went quickly, and Cannibis Solutions feels confident that the bankruptcy court will approve the sale.

As soon as the bid for the property was accepted by Thomas Blackmon Realty of Little Rock, Thomas said Cannibis Solutions filed two applications with the state — one for cultivation and one for a dispensary — by the Sept. 18 deadline.

The group — for which local business owner Bilo Beege is listed as incorporator/organizer in the Arkansas Secretary of State’s LLC listings — also forwarded fingerprint cards to the FBI for federal background checks and posted pre-approval surety bonds, Thomas said.

A total of 322 applications were turned

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LITTLE ROCK — A proposed policy change for Little Rock’s airport would ban medical marijuana use for all airport employees even if they qualify to use it.

The Arkansas Democrat-Gazette reported that the proposed change at Bill and Hillary Clinton National Airport comes in response to the Arkansas Medical Marijuana Amendment. The amendment passed in November allows doctors to recommend marijuana for patients suffering from specific medical conditions.

The law allows any employee who is a medical marijuana patient to be monitored, reassigned, put on leave, fired or be asked to complete a substance abuse program.

The airport employs about 150 people.

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Hear the report by KUAR’s Daniel Breen.

Potential operators of medical marijuana cultivation facilities and dispensaries came together at a half-day symposium in Little Rock Wednesday to discuss their expectations of what the new industry will be like.

Among the attendees was TV host Montel Williams, who gave the keynote address at the event organized by the Arkansas Medical Marijuana Association. Williams has multiple sclerosis, and has long advocated for medicinal cannabis use. His visit had added significance, since he recently accepted a position on the association’s board.

One hopeful distributor, who didn’t want to be named pending the approval of his license, said applications averaged about 1,000 pages long. 

“The application process was rather intense. We had over a three-and-a-half week process of 18 hours a day, just really in-depth, very in-depth process,” he said. 

The symposium, which was held at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock William H. Bowen School of Law, came two days after the deadline for would-be marijuana cultivators and dispensary operators to file applications with the state. According to Arkansas Medical Marijuana Association Board member Dan Roda, the number of applications received by the Department of Finance and Administration were around 300. 

Though legal medical pot represents a promising untapped market for some, Williams stressed most revenue from the cannabis industry should benefit patients. Mollie Balfe echoed this sentiment, saying her community of El Dorado seeks to benefit from a marijuana dispensary. 

“I think that it is the individual company’s responsibility to stimulate their own community with the money that they may make. As far as what the state does with their money, I feel that’s something out of our control,” Balfe said.

Balfe manages communications for South Arkansas Cannabis Solutions, a group that applied for both cultivation and

Read More Here...

By David Hutter/OF THE COMMERCIAL STAFF/[email protected]

A Jefferson County native intends to open a company to manufacture medical cannabis, which would happen only if he receives a license from the Arkansas Medical Marijuana Commission. Arkansas will allow five cultivation facilities and 32 dispensaries, with the dispensaries divided equally among eight parts of the state. The five-member Medical Marijuana Commission will spend the coming weeks going through the applications and scoring them based on several factors, including the ability to operate the facility, qualifications and its operations plan.

Natural State Agronomics Inc. CEO Ken Shollmier said he is spending $45 million to start his company to manufacture medical cannabis. He plans to hire 300 people and build a new facility in addition to an existing facility on a plot of 66 acres at 100 E. Boone St. in Redfield. The existing building used to house Charles River Laboratories.

“My wife has had some [medical] problems in the past,” Shollmier said. “She went to every doctor about a bad leg and a bad knee. Spent lots of money and everybody told her a different story. And nothing worked. We are going over a five-year period.”

“I do not care about marijuana,” Shollmier said. “I’ve never had it, don’t want it and am not involved in it. I am investing $45 million and I sure hope it works. I do believe the industry is probably two or three years out before it gets strong. I am not going to make money for the first two years.”

Shollmier hired Philip Stroud, a cannabis industry consultant for Natural State Agronomics. Shollmier said Stroud helped provide an oil cream from California to aid Shollmier’s wife, who rubbed the cream on her toe and did not have any more pain.

“It has happened with another person,” Shollmier

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